Golden Flecks

May 03

Golden Flecks

Sales and commission based professionals can make more money than doctors, lawyers, bankers and almost every other profession in the world. The man and woman who is willing to eat what they sow and not demand the security of salary has almost limitless income earning potential. Direct Sales (MLM) is one of the best paid professions and worst paid professions in the world. The difference between a high income earner and one who quits can often be can be minimal. The potential for extreme profitably and complete failure is as sharp as a razor’s edge.Sales and commission based professionals can make more money than doctors, lawyers, bankers and almost every other profession in the world. The man and woman who is willing to eat what they sow and not demand the security of salary has almost limitless income earning potential. Direct Sales (MLM) is one of the best paid professions and worst paid professions in the world. The difference between a high income earner and one who quits can often be can be minimal. The potential for extreme profitably and complete failure is as sharp as a razor’s edge.

Recently I heard a speech by Russell Ballard that perfectly illustrates how often times people are missing obvious fortunes right in front of their faces:

Oftentimes we are like the young merchant from Boston, who in 1849, as the story goes, was caught up in the fervor of the California gold rush. He sold all of his possessions to seek his fortune in the California rivers, which he was told were filled with gold nuggets so big that one could hardly carry them.

Day after endless day, the young man dipped his pan into the river and came up empty. His only reward was a growing pile of rocks. Discouraged and broke, he was ready to quit until one day an old, experienced prospector said to him, “That’s quite a pile of rocks you are getting there, my boy.”

The young man replied, “There’s no gold here. I’m going back home.”

Walking over to the pile of rocks, the old prospector said, “Oh, there is gold all right. You just have to know where to find it.” He picked two rocks up in his hands and crashed them together. One of the rocks split open, revealing several flecks of gold sparkling in the sunlight.

Noticing a bulging leather pouch fastened to the prospector’s waist, the young man said, “I’m looking for nuggets like the ones in your pouch, not just tiny flecks.”

The old prospector extended his pouch toward the young man, who looked inside, expecting to see several large nuggets. He was stunned to see that the pouch was filled with thousands of flecks of gold.

The old prospector said, “Son, it seems to me you are so busy looking for large nuggets that you’re missing filling your pouch with these precious flecks of gold. The patient accumulation of these little flecks has brought me great wealth.

Many times I meet network marketers and direct salesman that are guilty of the same success sin that the young man in the story suffered from; big-hitteritis. Many marketers are looking for the instant big score instead of cultivating people and prospects. I know of many company executives that are not interested in building their business one person/client at a time and instead look for the heavy hitter that will do all the work for them.

I can think of precious few companies that built their success upon an intant big score. The most successful Fortune 500 companies in the world built their fortunes with small and every day routines, one product and client at a time until they had the resources and the momentum to start gathering millions of dollars of sales.

Business, fortunes and success are built upon the small and simple things such as:

  • Developing relationships with your team day in and day out.
  • Using money, not people.
  • Understanding that sales is something you do for people, not to them.
  • Believing that real business momentum may take years to create and forgetting what got you there can stop it overnight.
  • Understanding that people (team member and clients) are the bedrock of your success.
  • Using consistent and persistent action with passion to improve is what your momentum will be built on.

Remember that success comes through a symphony of actions working together in order for a beautiful harmony of success to be heard. You cannot shortcut success if you want your business to be stable and strong.

Recently I heard a speech by Russell Ballard that perfectly illustrates how often times people are missing obvious fortunes right in front of their faces:

Oftentimes we are like the young merchant from Boston, who in 1849, as the story goes, was caught up in the fervor of the California gold rush. He sold all of his possessions to seek his fortune in the California rivers, which he was told were filled with gold nuggets so big that one could hardly carry them.

Day after endless day, the young man dipped his pan into the river and came up empty. His only reward was a growing pile of rocks. Discouraged and broke, he was ready to quit until one day an old, experienced prospector said to him, “That’s quite a pile of rocks you are getting there, my boy.”

The young man replied, “There’s no gold here. I’m going back home.”

Walking over to the pile of rocks, the old prospector said, “Oh, there is gold all right. You just have to know where to find it.” He picked two rocks up in his hands and crashed them together. One of the rocks split open, revealing several flecks of gold sparkling in the sunlight.

Noticing a bulging leather pouch fastened to the prospector’s waist, the young man said, “I’m looking for nuggets like the ones in your pouch, not just tiny flecks.”

The old prospector extended his pouch toward the young man, who looked inside, expecting to see several large nuggets. He was stunned to see that the pouch was filled with thousands of flecks of gold.

The old prospector said, “Son, it seems to me you are so busy looking for large nuggets that you’re missing filling your pouch with these precious flecks of gold. The patient accumulation of these little flecks has brought me great wealth.

Many times I meet network marketers and direct salesman that are guilty of the same success sin that the young man in the story suffered from; big-hitteritis. Many marketers are looking for the instant big score instead of cultivating people and prospects. I know of many company executives that are not interested in building their business one person/client at a time and instead look for the heavy hitter that will do all the work for them.

I can think of precious few companies that built their success upon an intant big score. The most successful Fortune 500 companies in the world built their fortunes with small and every day routines, one product and client at a time until they had the resources and the momentum to start gathering millions of dollars of sales.

Business, fortunes and success are built upon the small and simple things such as:

  • Developing relationships with your team day in and day out.
  • Using money, not people.
  • Understanding that sales is something you do for people, not to them.
  • Believing that real business momentum may take years to create and forgetting what got you there can stop it overnight.
  • Understanding that people (team member and clients) are the bedrock of your success.
  • Using consistent and persistent action with passion to improve is what your momentum will be built on.

Remember that success comes through a symphony of actions working together in order for a beautiful harmony of success to be heard. You cannot shortcut success if you want your business to be stable and strong.

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